AFRICA: ACCESS TO WATER AND PRIVATISATION: why proclaim access to water a fundamental human right?
Jacques Cambon
Despite UN recognition of access ?to safe and clean drinking water and sanitation as a human right that is essential for the full enjoyment f life and all human rights,? it is a right that is far from being realised in most parts of the world, writes Jacques Cambon.
http://www.pambazuka.org/en/category/features/73860



THE WATER CRISIS IN AFRICAN CITIES
Michel Makpenon
Access to running water remains in a state of crisis for a huge number if people across Africa, writes Michel Makpenon. With growing urbanisation across the continent, African cities will need the political determination to ensure sustainable water resources based onsocial need rather than commercial concerns, he stresses.
http://www.pambazuka.org/en/category/features/73836



GHANA'S QUEST TO QUENCH ITS THIRST
Alhassan Adam
Ghana has a long history of struggle against the inequitable allocation of water - beginning with protests against colonial water policy and, more recently, with opposition to water privatisation that began in the 1990s. Alhassan Adam writes about the history, the challenge to privatisation and the road ahead.
http://www.pambazuka.org/en/category/features/73856



THE COMMODIFICATION OF WATER AND LAND IN MALI
S'kou Diarra
Mali's Dogon have traditionally seen water as a source of life and a public good, with the right to water "a prerequisite to all other human rights." Now the privatisation of water threatens to exclude citizens from managing their most precious resource, leaving "the task ith a commercially minded technocracy", says S'kou Diarra.
http://www.pambazuka.org/en/category/features/73861



WATER PRIVATISATION: SENEGAL AT THE CROSSROADS

Olivier Petitjean and Elimane Diouf
While the Senegalese government wishes to "disengage financially from the water sector", it is precisely the previous public management of water that has begun to improve infrastructure and people's access to the resource.
http://www.pambazuka.org/en/category/features/73837



WATER MANAGEMENT REFORM IN RURAL AREAS OF SENEGAL
Moussa Diop
Changes to the water sector in Senegal that have seen a disengagement of the state and the promotion of the private sector have had unforeseen effects, writes Moussa Diop. Increased waste in domestic water consumption is one of the contradictions, while existing social relations also have a significant impact on the water delivery environment.
http://www.pambazuka.org/en/category/features/73859



POLLUTION: AFRICA'S REAL RESOURCE CURSE?
Khadija Sharife
A Tanzanian gold mine leaks polluted water into a major river. A mining town in Zambia is listed as amongst the most polluted places in the world. And a water pollution problem in South Africa that is caused by mining threatens national water resources. Khadija Sharife examines the hidden costs behind Africa's resource extraction reputation.
http://www.pambazuka.org/en/category/features/73857



PUBLIC-PUBLIC PARTNERSHIPS IN WATER: an overview

David Hall
Donors and development banks have largely focused on private-public partnerships in their attempts to develop water management capacity round the world, overlooking the vast expertise of public sector later operators. But now they too are starting to recognise the benefits of public-public partnerships for the provision of public later and sanitation services, writes David Hall.
http://www.pambazuka.org/en/category/features/73862



STRENGTHENING PUBLIC WATER: South–South–North public–public partnerships
Samir Bensaid
While both North-South partnerships and South-South partnerships have strengths and limitations, linking these in networked models is an effective way to mobilise expertise and funding and achieve success, writes Samir Bensaid, with reference to the example of ONEP (Morocco) and SNDE (Mauritania).
http://www.pambazuka.org/en/category/features/73858



THE WRONG CLIMATE FOR BIG DAMS: why Africa should shun hydropower megaprojects
Lori Pottinger
Hydropower dams are "well-suited for facilitating industrialisation and exploitation of natural resources, but not for reducing Africa's energy poverty", writes Lori Pottinger. And given the water-security problems posed by climate change, "the proposed frenzy of African dam building could be literally disastrous".
http://www.pambazuka.org/en/category/features/73863



THE COST OF ADDING CARBON CREDITS TO CLEAN WATER
Shiney Varghese
Linking carbon credits to clean water initiatives as a means of reducing carbon emissions is simply a corporate effort to cash in on measures to tackle climate change, writes Shiney Varghese.
http://www.pambazuka.org/en/category/features/73834