Courses

This page describes courses that can be taken as part of the Master of Engineering (Eng) in Telecommunications. This degree requires the student to take a selection of courses that together comprise at least 120 SAQA credits. A research mini-dissertation (that counts 60 SAQA credits needs to be taken as well).

Click on a course code to jump to additional information about the course.

Course Number Title NQF Credits HEQSF Level
EEE5004Z Minor Dissertation 60 09
EEE5135Z Information Theory & Error Control Coding 20 09
EEE5136Z Statistical Signal Theory 20 09
EEE5108Z Advanced Engineering Mathematics 20 09
Elective courses 60 09
Total credits 180 09

Elective Courses

Select courses to the value of at least 60 credits

Course Number Title NQF Credits HEQSF Level
EEE5032Z Digital Communication Systems 20 09
EEE5140Z Software‐Defined Radio 20 09
EEE5137Z Optical Communication Systems 20 09
EEE5121Z Microwave Components and Antennas 20 09
EEE5122F Computational Electronics I 20 09
EEE5138Z Broadband Communication Networks 20 09
EEE5139Z Wireless Data Network Convergence 20 09
EEE5033Z Advanced Topics in Communications & Networks 12 09
EEE5034Z Special Topics in Electrical Engineering 8* 09

*Please note that courses EEE5033Z and EEE5034Z will meet a single 20‐credit requirement and must be taken concurrently when selected.

20 NQF Credits at level 9

Convener: Associate Professor M Dlodlo

Prerequisites: none

Course outline: This course explains the fundamental ideas of information theory and the correspondences between the elements of this theory and certain natural concepts of importance in a wide number of fields, such as transmission, storage, authoring and protection of data. On the basis of concepts from probability calculus, models are developed for a discrete information source and a discrete communication channel. Further, the theoretical basis for developing source coding algorithms is provided, as well as the fundamentals of optimal data transmission through a discrete communication channel. Mathematical foundations of error-correcting codes; block codes fundamentals; cyclic codes; co-operating codes; soft-decision decoding; convolutional codes; iterative decoding (turbo codes, LDPC codes); applications.

Assessment: Coursework 30% and examination 70%

20 NQF Credits at level 9

Convener: Dr A Murgu

Prerequisites: MAM2083F/S, EEE2036S, EE3086F, or equivalents.

Course outline: The course originates in the realm of causal uncertainty over observed phenomena due to incomplete information from the real world. The theory of probability seeks to mathematically verify whether or not predictions about these phenomena are justifiable and pragmatic. The course challenges the participants to assume the probabilistic model of events where some of the possible determining factors may be unavailable. Mathematical statistical theory then enables us to examine the concepts and measure the likelihood of the relevance of those predictions to the physical world and our engineering applications within it. The development will include topics such as: probability theory, random variables, functions of a random variable, two or more random variables, sequences of a random variable, introduction to stochastic processes, second-order processes, and applications of random processes to fields such as communications.

Assessment: Coursework 30% and examination 70%

20 NQF Credits at level 9; 30 lectures, 5 tutorials and 5 practicals.

Convener: Emeritus Professor BJ Downing

Prerequisites: All undergraduate calculus, algebra and numerical methods required by a typical BSc Engineering (Electronics) degree.

Course outline: This course aims to develop an advanced understanding of radar and electronic protection mathematics. Selected topics include: statistics and random processes: probability and induction; causality versus randomness; distribution and density functions; mean and variance; moments; characteristic functions; probability space; conditional distributions and probability; Bernoulli’s theorem and games of chance; bivariate distributions; joint moments; joint characteristic functions; conditional expected values; ergodicity detection and estimation: systems with stochastic inputs; the power spectrum; parameter estimation; hypothesis testing; mean square estimation; Cramer-Rao bounds; stochastic convergence and limit theorems; finite-order systems and state variables; spectral representation of random processes; spectrum estimation; bandlimited processes and sampling theory; deterministic signals in noise; bispectra and system identification; filtering and prediction; Kalman filters. linear algebra: system of linear equations; Cramer’s rule; Gaussian elimination; Gauss-Jordan elimination; vectors and vector spaces; least squares; Gram-Schmidt process; vector differential calculus; vector integral calculus. Matrix algebra: matrix addition, multiplication, dot product, transpose; eigenvalue, eigenvector and eigenspace; Jordan normal form; matrix rank, determinants and inversion; matrix congruence and congruence relation; conjugate transpose and hermitian matrices; matrix orthogonality; matrix decomposition methods; specific types of matrices e.g. Toeplitz matrices. Numerical methods: numerical linear algebra, e.g. solving systems of linear equations and eigenvalue algorithms; Interpolation, e.g. polynomial interpolation, spline interpolation and trigonometric interpolation; finding roots of nonlinear equations; optimization, e.g. linear programming and nonlinear programming; numerical quadrature (i.e. integration); numerical differential equation solutions; and the Monte Carlo analysis.

DP requirements: 80% attendance of lectures and completion of tutorials/projects.

Assessment: Coursework 20%, examination 55% and project 25%.

15 NQF Credits at level 9; 24 lectures; tutorials and 8 practical exercises as required and a project.

Convener: Associate Professor M Dlodlo

Prerequisites: EEE3084W, EEE3086F or equivalent and postgraduate standing in telecommunications or radar.

Course outline: Digital Communication Systems Theory: Selection of content for imparting research skills, knowledge and aptitudes from: probability, random variables and random signal principles; modelling of digital communication signals and systems; modelling of information sources; optimum receivers, channel and system performance in the presence of Gaussian noise; synchronisation; channel models, channel capacity, and error-control coding for fading channels; current topics selected from band-limited channels, adaptive equalisation, resource allocation, multichannel and multicarrier systems, spread-spectrum signalling, optical communication signalling principles, and software-defined radios.

Practical Applications: selected problems from baseband and bandpass signalling; technical standards for wireless/optical/satellite-based communication systems; multiplexing and multiple access standards; next generation communication systems; software approaches to signal processing.

DP requirements: 80% attendance and satisfactory completion of coursework.

Assessment: Examination 50%, year mark 50%.

20 NQF Credits at level 9

Convener: Dr S Winberg

Prerequisites: none

Course outline: This course aims to provide advanced students with an overview of software-defined radio systems and the technologies necessary for successful implementation, as well as exposure to significant computer and hands-on project work necessary to implement working SDR systems. Students will be able to: Identify the fundamentals of the communication link, the characteristics of network protocols, and be able to discuss the allocation of radio resources and technologies. Understand the systems required by a software-defined radio to function and the trade-offs and limitations encountered in the design of a software-defined radio system. Understand the radio propagation channel for radio communications links, and the basics of designing antenna systems to accommodate the needs of a particular software-radio system. Calculate an accurate link budget for a software-defined radio system or other wireless communications link. Understand how analogue and digital technologies are used for software-defined radios and the topologies and applications of those networks.

Assessment: Coursework 30% and examination 70%

20 NQF Credits at level 9

Convener: Associate Professor M Dlodlo

Prerequisites: none

Course outline: This course aims to introduce advanced students to the physics of optoelectronic communication devices and their applications to communication systems. Topics include: optical fibre characteristics, lasers and light wave modulation, photonics, noise, receiver design, error control and system performance.

Assessment: Coursework 30% and examination 70%

20 NQF Credits at level 9; block release

Convener: Emeritus Professor BJ Downing

Prerequisites: none

Course outline: This advanced course will focus on microwave components and antennas used in radar systems. The design of components and antennas is a core part of the curriculum and includes an understanding of: filters and multiplexing: microwave filters, diplexers, duplexers, ferrites in circulators and isolators, isolator, gyrator, circulator, power tubes, klystron, travelling wave tube, backward wave oscillator antenna theory: antenna characteristics including gain, directivity, reciprocity far field, reflector antennas, antenna arrays, and radar antennas.

Assessment: Coursework 30% and examination 70%

20 NQF Credits at level 9; block release

Convener: Professor A Baghai-Wadji

Prerequisites: none

Course outline: This course introduces advanced students to classical, modern and cutting-edge computational techniques for modelling and simulation of micro-electronic, micro-acoustic, and photonic devices. The course provides instruction in: finite difference method, finite element method, boundary element method, classical statistical methods, standard integral transform techniques, variational analysis techniques, method of functional analysis, iterative techniques, asymptotic analysis methods and micro-acoustic devices, electromagnetic and acoustic near-fields, photonic devices, meso-scopic electronic devices.

Assessment: Coursework 30% and examination 70%

20 NQF Credits at level 9

Convener: Mr N Ventura

Prerequisites: Postgraduate standing in Electrical Engineering or background in undergraduate communication engineering course work.

Course outline: The course aims to develop an understanding of the fundamental techniques, algorithms and protocols underlying the recent advances in the field of broadband networking and ensure an understanding of the network architecture and protocols involved in the Evolved Packet Core (EPC). The course provides an introduction to broadband networking, covering principles and fundaments of the high performance technologies that enable the delivery of voice, video and data services, and provides a foundation for understanding the broadband communications infrastructure and the framework needed for broadband network solutions. These aspects include traffic control, policing and shaping, QoS provisioning, routing, flow control, scheduling and signalling. In addition to learning the architectural frameworks, students will be exposed to various analytical methods and simulation tools used in the design and engineering of next-generation networks. Topics include: Design and analysis of computer networks, modelling and performance evaluation, and queuing theory applied to computer networks. Traffic flow management and error control. Routing algorithms and protocols. Switch and router architectures. Extensions of internet technologies in various application domains. Mobile Broadband and Core Network Evolution overview of the Evolved packet system (EPS} Architecture, Data and Voice Services, Security in the Evolved packet Core, Quality of Service, Charging and Policy Control, Selection Functions in the EPC, Voice Services, LTE Broadcasting, EPS Network entities, Interfaces, Protocols and procedures.

Assessment: Coursework 30% and examination 70%

20 NQF Credits at level 9

Convener: Dr O E Falowo

Prerequisites: Postgraduate standing in Electrical Engineering or EEE3084W or EEE3083F and EEE3085S or equivalent.

Course outline: This course aims to introduce advanced students to wireless networks with an emphasis on architecture, components, and protocols, as well as the latest developments in 4G towards 5G wireless standards. New concepts of mobility management, software defined network and new developments will be covered together with 3GPP standards and Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) standard protocols. These examples will enable student engagement with the theoretical material and the related practical issues. Students will be able to understand the challenges associated with the latest generation of wireless networks and gain insight into new techniques under development.

Assessment: Coursework 30% and examination 70%

12 NQF Credits at level 9; 24 lectures; tutorials and 8 practical exercises as required.

Convener: Associate Professor M Dlodlo

Prerequisites: EEE3084W, EEE3086F or equivalent.

Course outline: This course aims to introduce students to advanced topics within their research areas in communication and networks, not covered in existing courses.

DP requirements: 80% attendance and satisfactory completion of coursework.

Assessment: June Examination 50%, year mark 50%.

8 NQF Credits at level 9.

Convener: Dr H Le

Prerequisites: EEE3084W, EEE3086F or equivalent.

Course outline: This course aims to introduce students to specialized topics in their research areas in electrical engineering, in order to understand subjects that are important to communication and networks, but are not covered in existing courses.

DP requirements: 80% attendance and satisfactory completion of coursework.

Assessment: June Examination 50%, year mark 50%.

60 NQF Credits at level 9.

Course outline: Candidates for the degree of M.Eng will be required to complete a project to be selected in consultation with the programme convener. A written project report is required and is the sole assessment of the course.

Assessment: Written work counts 100%.

Additional details: master’s dissertation. Work required includes literature searches and reviews; identification of the research problem, objectives and hypothesis; consideration of research methodology; planning for the active research phase; and ensuring that research infrastructure (e.g. apparatus etc.) is or will be in place. The student should maintain regular contact with his/her supervisor in order to show evidence of suitable progress towards these aims. The supervisor must indicate satisfactory fulfilment of the course aims prior to the student proceeding to the dissertation.

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